Peter H. Siegel

Peter H. Siegel

Status

  • 2010 - 2015, TTST Past EiC, Terahertz Science & Technology Past Editors, Terahertz Science & Technology, Publications**
  • 2018, Microwave Application Award, Past Awardees**
  • Speakers bureau, MTT-10 BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS, Technical Committees**
  • Vice Chair, Fellow Evaluation Committee, Standing Committees**

Biography

Peter H. Siegel (BA Astronomy, Colgate Univ., MS Physics, Columbia Univ., PhD Electrical Eng., Columbia Univ.) has held appointments as Faculty Associate in Electrical Engineering and Senior Scientist in Biology at the California Institute of Technology; and Senior Research Scientist and Technical Group Supervisor for Submillimeter Wave Advanced Technology (SWAT) at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, both in Pasadena California. He has been working in the areas of millimeter and submillimeter-wave technology and applications for more than 40 years, and has been Principle or Co- Investigator on more than 75 R&D programs and been involved in delivering critical hardware for four major THz space flight instruments. He has published more than 300 articles in the THz field, and has given more than 200 invited talks in the U.S. and abroad on this subject. Among many other duties, Dr. Siegel is founding Chair, and now serves as elected General Secretary, of the International Society for Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz), the oldest and largest venue devoted to the field of far IR techniques, science and applications. He also served as founding Editor-in-Chief (since 2010) of the first journal devoted exclusively to the topic of THz – the IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and Technology, which he brought from concept to an Impact Factor of 4.3 in only 3 years. Dr. Siegel has been an IEEE Distinguished Microwave Lecturer, co-Chair and Chair of MTT Committee 4—THz Technology, a TPC and Speaker’s bureau member, an MTTS AdCom member for 5 years and an organizer and chair of seven special THz sessions at the IEEE International Microwave Symposia.

Presentations

Terahertz Technology in Outer and Inner Space

After more than 30 years of niche applications in the space sciences area, the field of Terahertz Technology is entering a true Renaissance. While major strides continue to be made in sub-millimeter wave astronomy and spectroscopy, the past few years have seen an unprecedented expansion of Terahertz applications, components and instruments. Broad popular interest in this frequency domain has emerged for the first time, spanning applications in diverse as biohazard detection and tumor recognition. Already there are groups around the world who have applied specialized Terahertz techniques to disease diagnostics (1), recognition of protein structural states (2), monitoring of receptor-bindings (3), performing label-free DNA sequencing (4) and visualizing contrast in otherwise uniform tissue (5). A commercial Terahertz imaging system has recently started tests in a hospital environment (1) and high sensitivity imagers with deeper penetration into tissue have begun to emerge (6). Solicitations for more sophisticated instruments and enabling Terahertz components have filtered into US agency proposals from DoD and NASA, to NSF and NIH, and many research groups have sprung up, both in this country and in Europe and Asia. This talk will broadly survey Terahertz technology from its cradle applications in space science and spectroscopy to more recent biomedical and chemical uses.*

* Contact LRW for references and expanded summary by Dr. Siegel

Terahertz Technology in Outer and Inner Space

After more than 30 years of niche applications in the space sciences area, the field of Terahertz Technology is entering a true Renaissance. While major strides continue to be made in sub-millimeter wave astronomy and spectroscopy, the past few years have seen an unprecedented expansion of Terahertz applications, components and instruments. Broad popular interest in this frequency domain has emerged for the first time, spanning applications in diverse as biohazard detection and tumor recognition. Already there are groups around the world who have applied specialized Terahertz techniques to disease diagnostics (1), recognition of protein structural states (2), monitoring of receptor-bindings (3), performing label-free DNA sequencing (4) and visualizing contrast in otherwise uniform tissue (5). A commercial Terahertz imaging system has recently started tests in a hospital environment (1) and high sensitivity imagers with deeper penetration into tissue have begun to emerge (6). Solicitations for more sophisticated instruments and enabling Terahertz components have filtered into US agency proposals from DoD and NASA, to NSF and NIH, and many research groups have sprung up, both in this country and in Europe and Asia. This talk will broadly survey Terahertz technology from its cradle applications in space science and spectroscopy to more recent biomedical and chemical uses.*

* Contact LRW for references and expanded summary by Dr. Siegel